More > Special coverage > Predecessors - (27)

Predecessors catalogs the projects and organizations that were historically important to the development of the field of civic tech.

Computer Professionals for Social Responsibility

It educated policymakers and the public on a wide range of issues. CPSR incubated numerous projects such as Privaterra, the Public Sphere Project, the Electronic Privacy Information Center, the 21st Century Project, the Civil Society Project, and the Computers, Freedom and Privacy Conference. Founded by U.S. computer scientists at Stanford University and Xerox PARC, CPSR had members in over 30 countries on six continents. CPSR was a non-profit 501.c.3 organization registered in California. When CPSR was established, it was concerned solely about the use of computers in warfare.

Sunlight Foundation

The Sunlight Foundation is a national, nonpartisan, nonprofit organization that uses civic technologies, open data, policy analysis and journalism to make our government and politics more accountable and transparent to all.

mySociety

mySociety is a not-for-profit social enterprise that exists to invent and popularise websites and apps that enable citizens around the world to exert power over institutions and decision makers.

HousingMaps.com

HousingMaps was the very first Google Maps mashup, created before there was a Google Maps API. It overlaid Craigslist apartment and housing listings on a map, for some 30 US cities plus London.

Carl Malamud Launches Free Online Access to SEC EDGAR Records

Until this day, the only way to access the Securities and Exchange Commission's Electronic Data Gathering, Analysis and Retrieval (EDGAR) database of filings from public corporations and financial entities was to go to a special reading room in Washington, DC, or to pay private information services.

New York City Directories

New York City directories record the names and addresses of city residents, businesses, churches, schools, police stations, courts, and other government offices, as well as the names of individuals associated with those institutions. They also feature images, including maps, illustrations of buildings, and advertisements. NYPL's City Directory collection ranges from 1786 through 1934, with print and microfilm holdings belonging to the Rare Books and Milstein divisions. Subsequent telephone directories belonging to the Milstein division have also been added to this collection.

Appropriate technology movement

a movement (and its manifestations) encompassing technological choice and application that is small-scale, affordable by locals, decentralized, labor-intensive, energy-efficient, environmentally sound, and locally autonomous.

Back to Top