The Tech > Emerging tech > Smart Cities and sensors - (88)

Technology that quantifies the physical environment, such as traffic or environmental factors

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IDC Smart Cities Awards

Smart Cities catalyze the digital transformation of urban ecosystems to produce systemic environmental, financial, and social outcomes. Smart Cities are, by definition, focused on using emerging technologies and innovation to make cities more livable, and offer new services and economic opportunities. The cities and communities in North America have made significant strides in Smart Cities by leveraging technology and aligning services with the needs and expectations of residents. To recognize outstanding Smart Cities projects, IDC launched its Smart City North America Awards (SCNAA). Now in its fourth year, the 2021 awards recognize the progress North American municipalities have made and also provide a forum for sharing best practices to help accelerate Smart City development in the region.

SMARTFISH H2020

SMARTFISH H2020 is an international research project which aims to develop, test and promote a suite of high-tech systems for the EU fishing sector. The goal is to optimize resource efficiency, improve automatic data collection for fish stock assessment, provide evidence of compliance with fishery regulations and reduce the ecological impact of the industry.

Whose Streets report

Harvard report on “smart city” technology risks to civil liberties. Whose Streets? Our Streets! (Tech Edition) 2020-21 “Smart City” Cautionary Trends & 10 Calls to Action to Protect and Promote Democracy Rebecca Williams

Sage

The Sage project will design and build a new kind of national-scale reusable cyberinfrastructure to enable AI at the edge. Geographically distributed sensor systems that include cameras, microphones, and weather and air quality stations can generate such large volumes of data that fast and efficient analysis is best performed by an embedded computer connected directly to the sensor.

NYC Internet of Things Strategy

The Mayor’s Office of the Chief Technology Officer has developed the NYC Internet of Things Strategy in order to support a healthy cross-sector IoT ecosystem in New York City – one that is productive, responsible, and fair.

Current Water

Current is Chicago’s water innovation hub. Our goal is to develop water management policies and test new technologies that grow the blue economy, drive innovation, and solve pressing water challenges. Founded in Chicago in 2016, we bring together corporations, other nonprofits and governments to develop solutions that would be too risky or even impossible for any one group to undertake alone. The need for our work is greater than ever because water is no longer just an issue; it’s a crisis.

Open Seneca

Distributing air sensors to volunteer cyclists to map pollution data throughout Lisbon Sensores distribuídos. Cinco dezenas de ciclistas vão andar a medir a poluição atmosférica – Lisboa Para Pessoas

Array of Things

An intelligent urban measurement project that’s changing our understanding of cities and urban life. The Array of Things (AoT) is a collaborative effort among scientists, universities, federal and local government, industry partners, and communities to collect real-time data on urban environment, infrastructure, and activity for research and public use. AoT uses an open intelligent sensing and edge computing platform called Waggle, developed at Argonne National Laboratory. AoT was funded primarily by the U.S. National Science Foundation.

NYC City Scanner Pilot

Low cost, mobile air quality and other environmental sensors installed on City vehicles. The City Scanner is a low-cost alternative to traditional methods of collecting environmental data. The sensor attaches to the roof of vehicles and collects detailed data at a more geographic level than traditional fixed-position sensors. The City Scanner sensors capture data related to environmental conditions including air quality (particulate matter 1, 2.5, and 10), temperature, humidity, and road conditions in New York City. The solar-powered sensors are removable and do not permanently alter vehicles.

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